How tai chi changes habitual movement

Sunday, June 9, 2019 How we move says so much about us. We identify so closely with how we move. Whether or not we are aware of it, our manner of moving is very often a matter of self-image. Posture and gait even develop from attitudes—how we see ourselves and how we wish others to…

Taiji and Suzuki Roshi’s Zen Mind

I do tai chi as a way to not do other things that disrupt and cause stress. Practice is a meditation through which I may understand the nature of this moving meditation. When I began taiji, I had not yet explored sitting meditation; nor even moving meditation. I viewed taiji as an exercise that I…

Tai chi and a Buddhist notion

Impermanence more than implies motion . . . . through time and space, through body, sensations, mind and phenomena, encountered in our particularized journeys. Our shared journey. Tai chi practice and teaching is a sacred trust, because I have chosen to depend upon this methodology for attaining better health and awareness, and perhaps, enlightenment. I…

The mood of tai chi

Tai chi and qigong are moods--somewhat of an ephemeral notion to a novice perhaps, yet real to a long-term practitioner. If you skip practice for a certain amount of time, you begin to miss it. Your body might even crave it and you won't feel content until you practice. Both tai chi and qigong place…

Zhong Ding: A Fundamental Part of Tai Chi Practice

I recently saw a post on linkedin.com by Violet Li who writes about tai chi subjects at examiner.com. She often refers to Chen family masters but this time she interviewed a Wu Style practitioner and presents useful information about the lineage  of Wu Jianquan (Chien  Chuan) which is the Wu style I have studied. Good…