How tai chi changes habitual movement

Sunday, June 9, 2019 How we move says so much about us. We identify so closely with how we move. Whether or not we are aware of it, our manner of moving is very often a matter of self-image. Posture and gait even develop from attitudes—how we see ourselves and how we wish others to…

Filling gaps in learning tai chi

I've noticed that, while I received basics in beginning tai chi, much was skipped over. I entered mise-en-scene. I jumped into the middle of the stream. There was no actual "beginning." As a result, I've felt a gap in my learning progress. I think it was partly from a lack of organization in the presentation…

Five years of blogging about taijiquan

This week marks the fifth year of venturing into blogging about taijiquan and its internal mysteries. My first post on December 5, 2011 is entitled "What is Tai Chi?". I'm sure I will be trying to answer that question for the rest of my life. I may have wanted to quit at times, but I…

Tai chi and a Buddhist notion

Impermanence more than implies motion . . . . through time and space, through body, sensations, mind and phenomena, encountered in our particularized journeys. Our shared journey. Tai chi practice and teaching is a sacred trust, because I have chosen to depend upon this methodology for attaining better health and awareness, and perhaps, enlightenment. I…

External movement is a sign of internal tai chi

In tai chi practice, we look to the external to show signs of what the internal is doing. The external is an outward expression of the internal. Don't let that distract you and think that the external is all there is. It is only a tell-tale sign of the source of its movement. If the…