Beginning tai chi when younger may help avoid problems of aging

Doing taijiquan and its complement, qigong, can add great benefits to the lifestyles of younger practitioners, as well as reducing the effects of growing older. Why younger people don't get into tai chi is asked often and many reasons have been discussed. One is that "tai chi is for old people," as discussed in this…

A Comp. Review identified 163 different physiological and psychological health outcomes of taiji and qigong

This review [published in 2010] has identified numerous outcomes with varying levels of evidence for the efficacy for Qigong and Tai Chi, including bone health, cardiopulmonary fitness and related biomarkers, physical function, falls prevention and balance, general quality of life and patient reported outcomes, immunity, and psychological factors such as anxiety, depression and self-efficacy. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3085832/…

Tai chi and choosing a path of change

"You want to change the world? Change yourself." My Chinese martial arts teacher, George Xu, told me that once. Of course, I already knew that, but it's always good to be reminded. You can't get enough reminding, especially in the midst of living under the barrage that is this world in this time. Not that…

An Exercise for a Taiji Stroll

Sometimes I feel like I've stared at the computer for too long and I need to take a break, maybe go for a walk. Often, when I do, it's difficult to shift. It's like I'm still looking at the computer while I'm walking. The eye muscles are stagnated in the position of staring at the…

Tai chi and qigong can help break “bad” habits

Breaking old, or so-called "bad," habits is not easy. Though we commonly think of habits as bad, we develop them in the first place because they comfort us. Habits, routines and repetitive behaviors actually have useful purposes. And while they often do turn on us (like smoking, for example), acknowledging the positive aspects of habits…