Beginning tai chi when younger may help avoid problems of aging

Doing taijiquan and its complement, qigong, can add great benefits to the lifestyles of younger practitioners, as well as reducing the effects of growing older. Why younger people don't get into tai chi is asked often and many reasons have been discussed. One is that "tai chi is for old people," as discussed in this…

I like getting questions in class

“Every time we ask a question, we’re generating a possible version of a life.” – David Epston Questions in tai chi group practice give me something tangible to relate to. They challenge me to delve into knowledge immersed just below the surface, waiting to emerge and bring light to a topic of interest. They bring…

A note on “change” in tai chi

In taiji (tai chi) practice, I've heard people say: “change the mind, change the body” which has a catchy sound. Sometimes, I've heard the opposite: “change the body, change the mind.” I don't think it's one or the other, rather both have relevance at different times. Sometimes it's one and sometimes it's the other. Knowing…

A tai chi tip: Doing tai chi anywhere, anytime

Tai chi doesn’t have to be something you schedule to do. With a little knowledge you can practice a simple technique anywhere, anytime. Here’s one idea. Standing in Wuji . . . . or Being Like a Mountain One way to begin tai chi is simply by standing. For example, Wuji is the first posture…

An Exercise for a Taiji Stroll

Sometimes I feel like I've stared at the computer for too long and I need to take a break, maybe go for a walk. Often, when I do, it's difficult to shift. It's like I'm still looking at the computer while I'm walking. The eye muscles are stagnated in the position of staring at the…