Article: The positive lexicography project

This is about emotion words for which no English equivalent exists.

I like this quote from Dr. Lomas who has been researching these cool words and has built a “dictionary” of 1,000 words from all around the world and from diverse cultures. …especcially the final sentence, which reminds me of tai chi learning.

“In our stream of consciousness – that wash of different sensations feelings and emotions – there’s so much to process that a lot passes us by,” Lomas says. “The feelings we have learned to recognise and label are the ones we notice – but there’s a lot more that we may not be aware of. And so I think if we are given these new words, they can help us articulate whole areas of experience we’ve only dimly noticed.”

http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20170126-the-untranslatable-emotions-you-never-knew-you-had

Dr. Lomas’s website
https://www.drtimlomas.com/lexicography

Zhong Ding

Central equilibrium. This is the Chinese word I know it as—Zhong Ding. I assume readers are familiar with it.  I came to understand that central equilibrium is more than alignment.

Alignment has a linear quality that we can become aware of in our bodies. It is two-dimensional, a line between two points. Equilibrium, which we can also become aware of, is orientation in relation to our environment. It is multi-dimensional. It is how we balance ourselves in response to the pressures from outside, of which there are many.

Almost every move we make is a response to some external force in our environment. The environment could be the physical environment near us or it could be a more abstract environment — distant and foreign.

Part of the release, and the relief, of letting go of things that are not essential to our well-being, which is a tai chi practice, is distinguishing between what it’s necessary to be concerned about and what is not.

We confront the overwhelming pressure from outside with great risk. We cannot defeat it, but we can relax and let it be. We don’t have to be concerned that we must respond. Yin instead of yang. Let yang take care of itself. Focus attention on yin.

So the act, as simple as it may be, of letting something go—tension, stress, anything at all—is emancipating. Our bodies respond accordingly and become satisfied, contented, rested.

Tai chi is … finding your own inner silence

Tai chi is a practice at getting in touch with your own silence. Your inner place of peace where you’re surrounded by sound-proof walls and the external world is held at bay.

I was reminded by this when I discovered this article at Thrive Global: “The One Thing Your Brain Needs to Think Clearly.”

You must shut off something within yourself to go there. When you do all, the pressures of the daily world lose their significance, at least for a while. You can focus more on your interests.

Of course, there are many other ways to cozy up to inner silence, such as sitting in meditation and mindful breathing. I just happen to like tai chi a whole lot.

Tai chi “mood”

Taijiquan is about cultivating a mood and immersing yourself in it. Continuous and stable, you carry it through the day’s activities—as many as you can. It’s not easy to do this, but many will agree that the mood is very engaging and contagious. I can’t get much more specific without risking mutilating it trying to explain it.

You develop it in group and solo practice. Each practice is a return to cultivating it from where you last left off with it. Often, at some point after leaving class, you might forget this mood. But if you have a big enough taste of it, you’ll want to give it another try.

The more you try, the more you are able to do two things. One is to become familiar with the mood through practice and the second is improved memory. The result is that you’re carrying this mood more and more. You’re not only remembering it, you’re internalizing it. It becomes part of your viewpoint and integral to who you are, as in the case of real long-term practitioners.

It’s like anything that you do. The more you do it, the better you get and the more you get out of doing it. You perceive the external world from the point of view of that mood. It grows, matures, and strengthens. You develop speed, agility, and a greater sense of depth and breadth.

About me

I have studied Chinese internal martial arts since 1999, primarily taijiquan (Wu, Chen, Yang Panhou). Complementary training in varying degrees includes: Lan Shou Quan (Southern Shaolin and Cao Quan section of form), Xing Yi Quan, Tong Bei Quan, Hun Yuan Qigong (some Hua Gong and “primordial” qi), Ba Gua, and Liu He Ba Fa. I have traveled often to train with many teachers, primarily San Francisco, California and Shanghai, China; but also, El Paso, Washington, DC, and Los Angeles.

I have received numerous certificates of achievement for Qigong Instruction and Internal Martial Art Instruction.

My practice has been regular and sustained, which I believe is most important for receiving the greatest benefits of practice. I train in Durango, Colorado where I also teach taijiquan basics to a few dedicated practitioners. I am affiliated with Shanti School of Taijiquan (shantischool.com) and the World Association of Chinese Internal Martial Arts (wacima.com). See durangotaichi.com for my lineages and other info.

I founded Durango Tai Chi Instruction in response to a need where I live for a chance for others to learn authentic taijiquan. My China lineage holders, Master Xu Guo Ming (George), along with my first teacher Susan A. Matthews, have held strongly to the internal secrets of the art of movement of the taiji. They openly and freely share their knowledge. I hope the same for myself.

I like to write, and feel natural writing about tai chi, so I started this blog as a way of giving back to the world for what others have graciously given to me. This is the way of taijiquan.

Tim Richard, Instructor
Durangotaichi.com

Have you discovered your chi yet?

ma yueh liang

The great Wu Style Taijiquan Master Ma Yueh Liang said it took him 10 years to “discover” qi and the rest of his life to learn what to do with it (Bill Moyers, “The Mystery of Chi,” 1993). We’re all involved in a similar progression of discovery and discerning activities that bring qi into our daily routine.

The real change from a tai chi perspective is in the mind. We think it’s the body because that’s where the problem shows. The pain in there so we think the cause is there.

We have to shift something in our perception in order for the body to make the necessary changes it needs to heal and strengthen.

I suspect that we “discover” qi because it announces itself by virtue of dislodging and flowing, which in turn results from practicing tai chi movement.

You can view many video clips of Master Ma on youtube. I have one of him from many years ago on my website.

A Movie: Inn Saei, The Sea Within

The film, Inn Saei, is a fascinating peek into intuition, something that seems to live in the back of my mind much of the time. As one of the interviewees (Malidoma Some) in the film says,

“Intuition is … The stuff we are not aware of that lies just outside of our consciousness.”

This describes exactly what the practice of taijiquan tries to get us in touch with. Inn Saei means “the sea within,” but also “to see from within,” as well as “to see from the inside out.” I highly recommend watching it.

https://zeitgeistfilms.com/film/innsaeithepowerofintuition