How tai chi changes habitual movement

Sunday, June 9, 2019 How we move says so much about us. We identify so closely with how we move. Whether or not we are aware of it, our manner of moving is very often a matter of self-image. Posture and gait even develop from attitudes—how we see ourselves and how we wish others to…

Beginning tai chi when younger may help avoid problems of aging

Doing taijiquan and its complement, qigong, can add great benefits to the lifestyles of younger practitioners, as well as reducing the effects of growing older. Why younger people don't get into tai chi is asked often and many reasons have been discussed. One is that "tai chi is for old people," as discussed in this…

Tai chi and getting some energy back

It is said that we are born with a finite amount of energy and that is all we have to make it through life. As life progresses that supply of energy is depleted through living: events, act, thoughts, points of view. It takes energy to live. Less of our original life force becomes available to…

Integrating new movement to internalize it

Taiji is about moving differently. To move in a new way requires a fresh perspective. Start with gaining clarity of a habituated movement pattern. Habitual patterns are most difficult to see because they become “transparent” or invisible to us over time. So train your mind’s ability to focus and concentrate on the move. The eventual…

Article Forward: How practicing tai chi can help the heart

This article's news is good reading, but I'm a little disheartened as tai chi teacher. But that's okay. I still am forwarding it because it's yet another documentation of people utilizing tai chi with measurable success to address challenges they have with their health. Composed by Alice Park for Time Health, it describes a tai chi…